Texas governor warns of another LOCKDOWN and health experts predict US death toll will be 250,000

The governor of Texas has warned that he could reimpose a lockdown on the state if coronavirus prevention measures weren’t heeded, as states over the U.S. battled to obtain the pandemic under control.

Friday brought 63,900 new cases nationwide – a new record, according to data from Johns Hopkins University analyzed by CNN

Bioethicist Dr Zeke Emanuel said as much as 250,000 Americans could die directly from the coronavirus by the end of the year.  

Emanuel, who’s the vice provost for Global Initiatives and chair of the Department of Medical Ethics and Health Policy at the University of Pennsylvania, said the Trump administration’s response to the pandemic was ‘incompetent and pretty disastrous.’

The United States saw 63,900 new cases of COVID-19 nationwide Friday – a new record

‘Before the year has gone out, we’ll probably have, I might think, between 220,000 and 250,000 Americans who died directly from COVID, as well as those people who are dying indirectly,’ he told CBS’s podcast The Takeout.

‘You’ll have a huge upsurge in mortality because of COVID, and that’s, it seems in my experience, to be a failure,’ said Emanuel, a member of Joe Biden’s campaign task force to deal with the coronavirus. 

More than 3 million have died from COVID in the United States, the hardest-hit country

More than 3 million have died from COVID in the United States, the hardest-hit country

More than 800 people nationwide have died in each of the three days before Friday — a three-day total that’s 56 percent higher than through the same three days the other day.

Dr Deborah Birx, the coordinator of the White House coronavirus task force, said on Friday that she expected to soon see a rise in deaths among Americans infected with the virus.

‘In the United States we have a rise in the quantity of cases over the last specially three weeks,’ she said throughout a virtual COVID-19 conference. 

‘We never have seen this result in increased mortality but that is expected as the illness continues to spread in certain of our large metro areas.’

Healthcare workers in Texas, where the governor has threatened to reimpose lockdown

Healthcare workers in Texas, where in actuality the governor has threatened to reimpose lockdown

Her statement places her at odds with President Donald Trump, who has touted a falling death rate as an indicator of success in his approach to the herpes virus. 

In his July 4 speech, Trump said the U.S. had tested 40 million people and that 99 percent of cases were ‘totally harmless.’ 

A day or two later, on July 9 at a White House event, Trump said the united states had ‘dramatically reduced mortality rates’ regarding COVID and one of the lowest mortality rates ‘anywhere in the world.’ 

The New York Times on Friday tallied the percent change in average daily cases since states reopened, and found that, with a seven-day rolling average, infections in Florida were up by 1,393 percent.

South Carolina was up by 999 percent; Arizona by 858 per cent; and Texas by 680 per cent. 

New York was down by 52 per cent. 

California and Texas reported a daily full of deaths early in the day this week. Florida and Tennessee did so on Thursday.

Cases of COVID-19 are surging across the south and west of the United States

Cases of COVID-19 are surging over the south and west of the United States

Cars wait in line at a drive-through COVID-19 testing site in Miami Gardens, Florida

Cars wait in line at a drive-through COVID-19 testing site in Miami Gardens, Florida

People are tested for COVID-19 at a drive through testing site in Orlando, Florida

People are tested for COVID-19 at a drive through testing site in Orlando, Florida

In Phoenix, hospital officials are running out of morgue beds, Mayor Kate Gallego told MSNBC Friday. 

Maricopa County, where Phoenix is situated, is likely to soon receive refrigerated ‘morgue trucks’ much like those utilized in New York City

‘Several months ago, I warned of a potential tsunami if we did not just take this more seriously,’ said Richard Cortez, the state in Hidalgo County, southern Texas. 

‘The tsunami is here.’ 

On Friday afternoon Greg Abbott, the governor of Texas, said the worst was yet to come for his state.  

Greg Abbott, the governor of Texas, on Friday warned of a possible second lockdown

Greg Abbott, the governor of Texas, on Friday warned of a possible second lockdown

As of Thursday afternoon, 2,918 Texas had died of COVID-19. The state also reported nearly another 10,000 new cases of the illness. 

‘Things will become worse, and i want to explain why,’ that he told KLBK TV in Lubbock. 

‘The deaths that we’re seeing announced today and yesterday — which are actually over 100 — those are those who likely contracted COVID-19 in late May.

‘The worst is yet in the future as we work our way through that massive increase in people testing positive.’

Texans will also likely see an increase in cases a few weeks, Abbott said.

He said people respecting his face mask requirement might be the only thing standing between organizations remaining open and another shutdown.

‘The public needs to appreciate this was a really tough decision for me to create,’ that he said of his breathing apparatus mandate. 

Under his ruling – an abrupt U-turn for him – Texans in counties with an increase of than 20 cases must wear masks in public. Nearly 80 Texas counties have opted out of the order order, while others are refusing to enforce it. 

‘I made clear that I made this tough decision for starters reason: It was our last most useful effort to slow the spread of COVID-19. 

‘If we do not slow the spread of COVID-19, the next step will have to be a lockdown.’ 

The number of infections is continuing to rocket up in the United States

The number of infections is continuing to rocket up in the United States

Healthcare workers walk through the Texas Medical Center during a shift change as cases soar

Healthcare workers walk through the Texas Medical Center during a shift change as cases soar

Nearly 9,700 people were in Texas hospitals on Thursday – the best number because the pandemic began.

On Friday afternoon Abbott extended his disaster declaration for several Texas counties.

The previous day he had expanded his ban on elective medical procedures to cover a lot more than 100 counties across much of hawaii.  

In Houston, hospitals were forced to deal with hundreds of COVID-19 patients in their emergency rooms — sometimes for many hours or multiple days — while they scrambled to open additional intensive care beds, based on internal numbers shared with NBC News and ProPublica.

At the same time, the region’s 12 busiest hospitals are increasingly telling emergency responders they cannot safely accept new patients, at a level nearly 3 times that of a year ago, based on data reviewed by reporters.

Since Texas officials have not issued another stay-at-home order to slow the virus’s spread, hospitals will also be still seeing a steady flow of patients as a result of routine motor vehicle collisions, violent crime and heat-related medical emergencies. 

Earlier coronavirus outbreaks inundated emergency rooms in New York City and Detroit, but lockdown orders in those cities resulted in fewer motor vehicle collisions and a decrease in violent crime, freeing more space in ERs for COVID patients. 

Multiple hospitals in the city are running out of instantly available nonsurgical ICU beds, including both of the city’s top-tier trauma centers, Ben Taub Hospital and Memorial Hermann’s flagship hospital in the Texas Medical Center. 

The shortage was apparent in the daily status report prepared Wednesday by the SouthEast Texas Regional Advisory Council, which coordinates the Houston region’s emergency medical response.

COVID-19 testing in Edinburg, Texas, where 2,918 people have lost their lives so far

COVID-19 testing in Edinburg, Texas, where 2,918 folks have lost their lives so far

A medical team fight to save the life of a patient in United Memorial Medical Center in Houston

A medical team fight to truly save the life of a patient in United Memorial Medical Center in Houston

In Florida, meanwhile, health officials reported 11,433 new cases and 93 deaths, according to data on the Florida Department of Health website.

Friday’s data marked the 2nd time the state’s single-day tally topped 11,000. 

The health department reported accurate documentation 11,458 cases on July 4.

Over 40 hospitals in Florida are now hitting their limit with regard to ICU capacity, based on a CNBC News report published on Tuesday.

On Friday, however, Ron DeSantis, governor of Florida, denied that there clearly was a lack of ICU beds in the state

‘You’ve got a lot of beds available,’ that he said at a news conference in Orlando, adding that no major hospital system in the state ‘has even visited like a surge level.’ 

Ron DeSantis, governor of Florida, pictured at a news conference in Orlando on Friday

Ron DeSantis, governor of Florida, pictured at a news conference in Orlando on Friday

As of Friday, there are 3.16 million confirmed cases of COVID-19 in the United States

As of Friday, there are 3.16 million confirmed cases of COVID-19 in the United States

California reported 149 coronavirus-related deaths on Thursday, the highest daily total for the state, and total cases topped 300,000 on Friday. 

California’s positivity rate as a 14-day average is climbing and stands at 7.4 per cent, with people involving the ages of 18-49 accounting for almost 60 per cent of all cases.

Also setting daily records for new COVID-19 cases were Utah with 850, Louisiana with 2,642 and Georgia with 4,484, health officials said. 

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