Jamaica and Dewsbury Rams prop Jon Magrin finds voice in fight against racism | Rugby League News

Magrin spoke on the Black Lives Matter Leeds protest final weekend and says: “It’s not a black issue, it’s a world issue”

Last Updated: 25/06/20 5:58am

Jamaica and Dewsbury prop Jon Magrin spoke finally weekend’s Black Lives Matter Leeds protest

Prior to final weekend, Jon Magrin had by no means engaged in any type of public talking.

Yet there was the Jamaica worldwide, stood on stage on the Black Lives Matter protest in Leeds’ Hyde Park, on the brink of share his experiences in the game to an viewers in the tens of hundreds.

Side-by-side with media persona and Jamaica Rugby League operations director Alex Simmons, the Dewsbury Rams prop joined the ranks of athletes throughout all sports activities who’ve began to talk out against the injustices they’ve confronted.

For Magrin, the time for staying silent was over.

“I’ve never spoken in front of anyone before, so it was a bit of a surreal experience speaking in front of 14,000 people,” Magrin instructed Sky Sports.

“It’s at all times been a difficulty which is near my coronary heart. Obviously, being a black male, I’ve seen injustice and felt it.

“Across the world, there is a massive race issue. As much people claim that there isn’t, for me it’s quite clear to see having been subject to racism countless times in my life.

Magrin and Jamaica RL operations director Alex Simmons at the Black Lives Matter Leeds protest

Magrin and Jamaica RL operations director Alex Simmons on the Black Lives Matter Leeds protest

“It’s got to a point now where doing nothing isn’t enough and silence is complicity, so I want to be as active as I can.”

‘It’s not a black situation, it is a world situation’

Coming by way of the academy system at London Broncos, Magrin was a part of a crew which featured gamers from a various array of ethnic backgrounds, together with there being a number of black gamers in the senior crew.

But at different occasions throughout his profession, the 31-year-old has discovered himself in altering rooms the place racist jokes are virtually accepted and black gamers are discouraged from talking out for worry of being seen to have a chip on their shoulder.

Magrin tells of even being topic to racist remarks from coaches and listening to monkey chants at video games. However, he has sensed individuals from all walks of life are actually saying sufficient is sufficient.

Black Lives Matter doesn’t suggest solely black lives matter. What we’re saying is: Until black lives matter, all lives will not matter.

Jon Magrin

“It does feel like there is a change, confidence growing – and what’s encouraging for me is not just black people speaking out, but people of all creeds and colours,” Magrin mentioned.

“It’s not a black situation, it is a world situation. Obviously, the Black Lives Matter marketing campaign is spearheading this, and I do not know what number of occasions I’ve defined that Black Lives Matter doesn’t suggest solely black lives matter.

“What we’re saying is: Until black lives matter, all lives won’t matter. This is a global issue, not just a black issue.”

Many in rugby league shall be shocked to listen to of such incidents, significantly as the game prides itself on being inclusive and celebrating the black gamers who’ve made such a useful contribution all through the code’s 125-year historical past.

Super League and the RFL have each proven solidarity in the fight against racism this week, although, with Simmons and ex-York and Barrow participant turned coach Dean Thomas main the primary of a collection of motion classes on Wednesday as a part of the governing physique’s inclusion and variety plans.

Magrin is in little question rugby league can function a car for bringing individuals from totally different backgrounds collectively too.

“We’re all human, at the end of the day, and it would be nice if rugby league can be an avenue to bring that community – and for a large part it does,” Magrin mentioned.

“I’ve played with people from all over the world – New Zealand, Papua New Guinea, France – and it’s nice to connect with those people I would never usually connect with and learn about their cultures.

We’re all human, at the end of the day, and it would be nice if rugby league can be an avenue to bring that community – and for a large part it does.

Jon Magrin

“With Jamaica, we’re meeting the actual islanders which is nice to have a better insight into my own culture.”

Onto the world stage

Magrin is certainly one of a major variety of UK-based gamers aiming to be a part of the squad for Jamaica’s first Rugby League World Cup look subsequent 12 months, with Super League stars like Michael Lawrence, Ashton Golding and Ben Jones-Bishop amongst these in competition too.

The crew, who’re in Group C together with New Zealand, Ireland and Lebanon, shall be primarily based in Leeds throughout the event and Magrin is optimistic the Jamaican squad may help to carry the entire group collectively.

Indeed, he speaks passionately about how becoming a member of collectively to play a recreation a rugby league is a good leveller to point out individuals from totally different backgrounds how comparable they’re.

Magrin could feature for Jamaica at next year's Rugby League World Cup

Magrin may characteristic for Jamaica at subsequent 12 months’s Rugby League World Cup

“The best way to combat race issues is for everyone to see each other on a human level and rugby league is a big, level playing field,” Magrin mentioned.

“When you get on the sphere, it is you against them for 80 minutes. It would not matter what has gone earlier than or what will occur in the long run, it is simply that second that issues and you allow the sphere and shake palms.

“It’s a good model and a good way to look at life in terms of coming together for one thing. There are little things that can do that in life and rugby league is one of them.”



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