Historic Welsh tearoom was left to grow ‘in sympathy’ with the public during lockdown

It’s not just humans who desire a haircut! Historic Welsh tearoom which was left to grow ‘in sympathy’ with the public during lockdown is left looking just like a ‘hairy woodland monster’

  • This 15th Century tearooms in at Llanrwst, North Wales,desperate need of a trim 
  • Tu Hwnt I’r Bont Tearoom has been shut since the UK locked down in mid-March
  • Tim Maddox and his wife Ayla, who run the cafe, let the Virginia creeper grow 
  • They let the it grow ‘in sympathy of everybody that needs a lockdown haircut’

After  three months of lockdown we all have been looking forward to a haircut on July 4 – and this Welsh cottage is not any exception.

Rising out of the ground just like a hairy woodland monster, the 15th Century tearooms is in desperate need of a trim.

Tu Hwnt I’r Bont (Beyond the Bridge) Tearoom, at Llanrwst in North Wales, has been shut since the UK locked down in mid-March.

Tim Maddox, who has been running the café with his wife Ayla, for the past 17 years said that, between May and August, they generally trim the Virginia creeper that cloaks the 520-year-old building once weekly to keep it at bay.

Tim Maddox (pictured), who has been running the café with his wife Ayla, for the past 17 years said that, between May and August, they usually trim the Virginia creeper that cloaks the 520-year-old building once a week to keep it at bay

But during the pandemic they decided to leave it to grow ‘in sympathy’ with the general public, who have been denied a trip to the hairdressers by Covid-19

 But during the pandemic they decided to leave it to grow ‘in sympathy’ with the general public, who’ve been denied a vacation to the hairdressers by Covid-19

But during the pandemic they decided to leave it to grow ‘in sympathy’ with the general public, who have been denied a trip to the hairdressers by Covid-19.

‘It looks like a hairy woodland monster doesn’t it?’ he said.

‘Normally, no body sees it like this because, from the last bank holiday in May until the August bank holiday, we cut it once a week to keep the creeper off the windows.

‘However, we decided to pay homage to the pandemic, and in sympathy of everyone that requires a lockdown haircut, by leaving it to grow.   

‘There’s three windows on the ground floor, which you can still just about see and the gradually disappearing door. 

‘But the windows and gables on the first floor have gone, they’ve merged in to one mass of monster Virginia creeper.’

Tu Hwnt I’r Bont (Beyond the Bridge) Tearoom, at Llanrwst in North Wales, has been shut since the UK locked down in mid-March.

Tu Hwnt I’r Bont (Beyond the Bridge) Tearoom, at Llanrwst in North Wales, has been shut since the UK locked down in mid-March.

‘Normally, nobody sees it like this because, from the last bank holiday in May until the August bank holiday, we cut it once a week to keep the creeper off the windows,' said Tim

‘Normally, no body sees it like this because, from the last bank holiday in May until the August bank holiday, we cut it once a week to keep the creeper off the windows,’ said Tim

Pubs and restaurants are due to reopen in England on July 4, but Wales has been stricter about relaxing lockdown measures. 

The Welsh Government is probably to keep their eateries shut until July 9 at the earliest, when the next review is scheduled to take place.

The tearooms, on the bank of the Rover Conwy, usually attract attention, from tourists and amateur photographers alike, in September when the grassy green creeper coating the building transforms to bright copper red (pictured), heralding the start of Autumn

The tearooms, on the bank of the Rover Conwy, usually attract attention, from tourists and amateur photographers alike, in September when the grassy green creeper coating the building transforms to bright copper red (pictured), heralding the start of Autumn

‘Wales is still in lockdown, but we are hoping we will be able to open up at the end of July or beginning of August,’ Mr Maddox added.

‘The weather has been so great that we could have had an incredible year, had it maybe not been for the pandemic. 

‘It’s such a shame. 

‘When we reduce the creeper that will be the indication we’re opening up again.’

The tearooms, on the bank of the Rover Conwy, often attract attention, from tourists and amateur photographers alike, in September when the grassy green creeper coating the building transforms to bright copper red, heralding the start of Autumn.

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