Fr. Bedros Shetilian conducts Troy, N.Y., orchestra in Genocide commemoration

Fr. Bedros Shetilian conducts Troy, N.Y., orchestra in Genocide commemoration

Fr. Bedros Shetilian, a graduate of the St. Petersburg Conservatory, conducts the Troy Orchestra.

Troy, N.Y. – On the evening of April 25, the New York Capital District Armenian Genocide Committee hosted the 94th Commemoration of the Armenian Genocide. This year’s event was one of music featuring the Troy Orchestra under the direction of Fr. Bedros Shetilian. Fr. Bedros graduated from the St. Petersburg Conservatory in Russia. He has worked with internationally known orchestras like the St. Petersburg Philharmonic and the Moscow Chamber Orchestra and has toured several countries including England, Sweden, and Finland. Fr. Bedros is serving at Holy Cross Armenian Apostolic Church in Troy, New York, and St. Gregory the Illuminator Armenian Church in Springfield, Massachusetts.

Also featured in the evening performance was opera singer Chakee Kazangian, who sang “Karoon” and “Kele, Kele,” both by Gomidas, and “Ororotsayin” by Parsegh Ganachian. Ms. Kazangian started singing in the Armenian schools in Beirut. She moved to Australia and graduated from the Sydney Conservatory as an opera singer. As a member of the Sydney Opera Company, she sang several operas in the famous Sydney Opera House to both Armenian and American audiences. She has toured Armenia, Brazil, and Syria and has recorded two CDs. Ms. Kazangian presently resides in the Capital District and is choir director at Holy Cross Armenian Apostolic Church in Troy, where she is a dedicated volunteer.

A third feature was Melynda Matheke, an elementary music teacher in a local school district who is a flute virtuoso. Ms. Matheke performed J.S. Bach’s Orchestra Suite No 2 in B minor, for solo flute and chamber orchestra. Ms. Matheke graduated from the Crane School of Music at SUNY Potsdam.

All performers were extraordinary. The Troy Orchestra performed many songs including the five Armenian songs “Groong,” “Yerginken Amber,” “Keler Tsoler,” “Dzirani Dzar,” and “Etchmiadzin Dance.”